Creative Ballarat
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Public Art

Our City as a Living Canvas.

Our Public Art

 
Mother Earth, 1952. A tribute to nature’s gifts of mining and agriculture. Local resident Frank Pinkerton commissioned sculptor George Allan to make the work from Hawkesbury freestone and granite.

Mother Earth, 1952. A tribute to nature’s gifts of mining and agriculture. Local resident Frank Pinkerton commissioned sculptor George Allan to make the work from Hawkesbury freestone and granite.

In the placement of each piece of public art throughout our city, whether it’s a memorial or a bust or a contemporary statement, it has been closely discussed, evaluated and considered. Every single piece has been placed at a specific moment in time, highlighting a particular moment, event or person.

Public art is about more than just the works themselves.

Each piece signifies a message that people wish to convey and to express what kind of world they are experiencing at a specific point in time.

Public art is important because it’s exactly that – it’s public. It’s free. It’s open to everyone. There are over 100 pieces of public art placed throughout our city and surrounds.

From the central Sturt Street Gardens, to pieces in Bridge Mall, the Botanic Gardens and around Lake Wendouree. We have a city-wide collection of art that we treat just like an open-air gallery, through curation, maintenance, repair and cleaning.

As our city grows, it is important that we continually grow our understanding of what constitutes public art. With the implementation of the Creative City Strategy we are encouraging growth in temporary and ephemeral artistic expressions, as well as growing our traditional public art pieces.  

Take a walk through some of our city’s permanent public art collection


 
Travis Price street art in Hop Lane.

Travis Price street art in Hop Lane.

 

Temporary Public Art / Street Art

Street art is the production of artistic concepts created in appropriate public spaces with required permissions.

Ballarat supports street art, and we recognise that it takes many forms. We want to make sure that people know and understand the process for developing a street art work, so we’ve developed a step-by-step guide to scoping, getting permissions, producing and completing a work.

download the street art fact sheet▸


marrup laarr - deanne gilson, 2019

Launch of Marrup Laar, March 2019 - photography  Yum Studio

Launch of Marrup Laar, March 2019 - photography Yum Studio

Murrup Laar (Ancesteral Stones)

Artist Deanne Gilson at the opening of the Murrup Laarr (Ancestral Stones) - photo  Yum Studio

Artist Deanne Gilson at the opening of the Murrup Laarr (Ancestral Stones) - photo Yum Studio

The North Garden Indigenous Sculpture Park is located on the edge of Lake Wendouree and an important space for the traditional owners of the land, the Wadawarrung people. Deanne Gilson, a Wadawarrung community member and established artist, installed the first piece of the Sculpture Park in early 2019.

Her exhibition piece – Murrup Laarr – consists of a traditionally built stone Bungaree hut in the middle of a circle of basalt stones, marked with ceramic plates reflecting the stories and symbols of the local people.

Deanne’s deep connection to the land is revealed through the stark sentinels of stone, and her work is both nurturing as well as melancholic.

The juxtaposition of the small house, whose walls carry handprints from the community, within the circle of watching basalt reveal the heartbreaking relationship Deanne has with the loss of her land, and yet she remains living on the territory stolen from her forebears.